Suffolk DA Rachael Rollins vows Sean Ellis case ‘is not over’

As Sean Ellis’ case receives renewed attention in the wake of a new Netflix documentary, Suffolk District Attorney Rachael Rollins on Sunday said she’s “deeply invested” in the case and vowed to examine whether Ellis should be totally exonerated.
Ellis in 1995 was convicted in the murder of Boston Police Detective John Mulligan during an armed robbery, but that decision was overturned in 2015.
Ellis was released in 2018 after 22 years behind bars, and the case was dropped amid revelations of police misconduct and corruption — which have been highlighted in the new Netflix documentary “Trial 4.”
Ellis’ murder and armed robbery convictions were overturned, but the gun possession charge remains, Rollins noted on Sunday.
“We’re going to look at whatever it is Sean’s lawyer files in this case, but Sean Ellis is not over,” she said on WBZ’s “Keller At Large” show.
“Like all of the people that watched this case, I was deeply disturbed by what it is we saw,” Rollins said, citing the “level of corruption” by detectives who worked on the case.
She noted that the Ellis case happened only a few years after Charles Stuart falsely accused a Black man of killing his pregnant wife. Charles was the actual murderer, and took his own life.
“This is a terrifying time in our city,” Rollins said of that period in the late 1980s and early 1990s.
“I am deeply invested in this case,” she said of the Ellis case. “I think it’s a brand on our city, and not a good one.”
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Boston Police did not respond to a request for comment on the case, or Rollins’ comments.
All these years later, the city and state are still dealing with major corruption scandals, Rollins said. She cited the drug lab scandals involving Annie Dookhan and Sonja Farak, the State Police overtime scandal, and the overtime fraud scheme with Boston Police officers.
“It’s not just limited to the police,” Rollins said. “Every profession has people who will take advantage of the system. We just need better oversight and audit function.”

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