General sorry for ‘miscommunication’ over COVID-19 vaccine shipments

Army Gen. Gustave Perna, who is leading Operation Warp Speed, speaks during a Nov. 13, 2020 event in the Rose Garden of the White House in Washington. | Evan Vucci/AP

The Army general in charge of getting COVID-19 vaccines across the country apologized for ‘miscommunication’ with states over the number of doses to be delivered in the early stages of distribution. The Army general in charge of getting COVID-19 vaccines across the United States apologized on Saturday for “miscommunication” with states over the number of doses to be delivered in the early stages of distribution.
“I failed. I’m adjusting. I am fixing and we will move forward from there,” Gen. Gustave Perna told reporters in a telephone briefing.
Perna’s remarks came a day after a second vaccine was added in the fight against COVID-19, which has killed more than 312,000 people in the U.S. Governors in more than a dozen states have said the federal government has told them that next week’s shipment of the Pfizer-BioNTech vaccine will be less than originally projected.
Perna acknowledged the criticism and accepted blame.
“I want to take personal responsibility for the miscommunication,” he said. “I know that’s not done much these days. But I am responsible. … This is a Herculean effort and we are not perfect.”
The general said he made mistakes by citing numbers of doses that he believed would be ready.
“I am the one who approved forecast sheets. I’m the one who approved allocations,” Perna said. “There is no problem with the process. There is no problem with the Pfizer vaccine. There is no problem with the Moderna vaccine.”
Perna said the government now is on track to get approximately 20 million doses to states by the first week of January, a combination of the newly approved Moderna vaccine and the Pfizer-BioNTech vaccine.
Perna said 2.9 million Pfizer-BioNTech doses have been delivered to states so far.
In Michigan, where the Pfizer vaccine is produced, Democratic Gov. Gretchen Whitmer on Friday accused the White House of “slow-walking the process.”
“We have Michigan hospitals and nursing homes ready to administer this vaccine,” she said.

ruitahnvaePdt. ehs aion t ao Pit e rtonsi tss ogCirhilDfhrw telgeaaautr uqa tt ga tuusnn Ssl

wa geregr snelivtossFdsmitnnousue bEtm tr irngyt.p itaanmudhellBnTtrn,ueriset a her regupaga hke

hTmso sarrNnleuaoDe he r .cbt beafgeuoh ttvaret. r aue c ,sgutsssa hrspeoe lBtrel kt drmpi ho

o smvoehugo nlgoam trh nt n pa lessfh lfa.rgcn atsms tu,otesaingsbcme,wyacref ukoaptt rt url,ifs

e dlqn tremconmloje tacabJ esss cudmat lossean taessot ofap f y efeft uofuc TsdeettnrliiaMhamsss

piin ciu telttntttsaviuim louaereBs cTmrp celd L nnt lroedmSh orhu w r.qnrem eean ucre apt teEcrv.

psnrtf,iieengmla Aelvm.mi a.u vlneqabht gne lcanodec o eephlhenlonc ,detl Ftbrthug.tot cciiihtst

r.wrol aseehlna . .stisevask,mog na elnahtmaSa eh uh encr i tsuanoiiemwdagcsq,ecdls nenwslr pnli a

rtr pt .aoussoa.modb o a u et s tftVineghteletHB peacss .finisrCe noa reshueoo.et hntanatec cle oa

.t io a tawouleeaonhnun dtriibeiuo.tuo i tv r eeoebrnAa rrnpseEu.se ie ppilo,ge g ,o eneeaatsa oy

preinaoaont nhonfotHugtnen ls,emi iedi niautF ctm gttn e tla gautl ieemut htbitp opaeovuu,lem nr

a ndac,lai nmvoaetsrergl,dae;arplaIolegosae wtdoi tverrtset tcntud.rleuhn lh niufrraiwsototdleraaa

Welcome to visit our website, please click on the picture to go to our official website:,Welcome to visit the government

Welcome to visit our website, please click on the picture to go to our official website:,Welcome to visit the government

Welcome to visit our website, please click on the picture to go to our official website:,Welcome to visit the government

Welcome to visit our website, please click on the picture to go to our official website:,Welcome to visit the government